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Viet_Racer

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https://www.carscoops.com/2022/07/h...et-a-plug-in-hybrid-powertrain-in-the-future/

Honda’s New Civic Type R Could Get A Plug-In Hybrid Powertrain In The Future

The Type R is fitted with an upgraded version of the turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder petrol engine of its predecessor, without any sort of electrical assistance. However, Ko Yamamoto who works as a technical advisor for Honda Europe, told Autocar that anything is possible for the hot hatch, adding that he wouldn’t exclude electrification.

More specifically, Yamamoto said: “We can’t do a pure electric powertrain on this platform, but I imagine it can take up to a certain level of plug-in hybrid”. Indeed, the architecture that is underpinning the eleventh generation of the Honda Civic has proven it can handle electrification, with the compact model being exclusively available as a hybrid in the European market.

The Civic’s platform is also compatible with all-wheel-drive as proven by the mechanically-related CR-V. However, the Type R will stay true to its FWD nature in favor of lower weight. Yamamoto was clear in this regard: “I think four-wheel drive doesn’t really cope with the Type R principal. It’s not even necessarily quicker, but it is heavier.”

In any case, a plug-in hybrid system could vastly increase the power output of the hot hatch but also add weight. Electrification could also bring improved performance and driving dynamics as hinted at by Yamamoto: ” There are certain attributes that are important for a Type R: the ultimate response, the unity between driver and machine. How that’s being achieved? That’s another story, and I’m quite sure it can be achieved with some kind of electrification.”

Reading between the lines, Honda could be working on a Civic Type R PHEV with more power and torque than the current ICE-only model which is said to produce 326 hp (243 kW / 330 PS) and 310 lb-ft (420 Nm) of torque according to a leaked brochure. The electrified model could be introduced in a few years’ time, serving as a replacement for Honda’s last pure-ICE model.
 

Warpspeed

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They better hurry up if they are going to do it. California might/are going to ban the sale of ICE vehicles by 2035. We(California) always starts shit up and other states follow.
 

Whitboy82

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They better hurry up if they are going to do it. California might/are going to ban the sale of ICE vehicles by 2035. We(California) always starts shit up and other states follow.
🤮
 

Boostlag

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considering how much money fossil fuels make up the economy and the lobbies in the government. All this talk about going switching over to electric is hot air. Too many people make too much money for it to stop the gravy train, the powers that be don't care about the environment.
 

Whitboy82

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considering how much money fossil fuels make up the economy and the lobbies in the government. All this talk about going switching over to electric is hot air. Too many people make too much money for it to stop the gravy train, the powers that be don't care about the environment.
Not to mention, the environment isn’t much better off electric. Once you factor all the heavy metal factories pumping out toxic batteries, and all their byproducts, and let’s not forget where the power comes from, in most places, to charge up that EV.
 

Rhorn

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Not to mention, the environment isn’t much better off electric. Once you factor all the heavy metal factories pumping out toxic batteries, and all their byproducts, and let’s not forget where the power comes from, in most places, to charge up that EV.
Thats a very common myth that is spread about EVs and its simply not true. The emissions are higher to produce an EV but they taper off because they do not produce emissions. It would only be a 25% increase in capacity from the power gird which can easily be increased. The grid has increased by 4% every year from 1960-2000. Also EVs can be used as energy storage for the grid.

You can be cynical and argue that EVs aren't much better for the environment, which you are not wrong technically because its impossible to completely eliminate the impact we have on the environment as humans living in a post industrial revolution world. However, it is wrong to suggest that the "environment isn't much better off electric." EVs have a lower carbon footprint than gasoline cars even when accounting for coal powered plants to charge them. Its fine if you don't like EVs, but dont spread misinformation please
 
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Whitboy82

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Thats a very common myth that is spread about EVs and its simply not true. The emissions are higher to produce an EV but they taper off because they do not produce emissions. It would only be a 25% increase in capacity from the power gird which can easily be increased. The grid has increased by 4% every year from 1960-2000. Also EVs can be used as energy storage for the grid.

You can be cynical and argue that EVs aren't much better for the environment, which you are not wrong technically because its impossible to completely eliminate the impact we have on the environment as humans living in a post industrial revolution world. However, it is wrong to suggest that the "environment isn't much off electric." EVs have a lower carbon footprint than gasoline cars even when accounting for coal powered plants to charge them. Its fine if you don't like EVs, but dont spread misinformation please
I said it isn’t much better, that’s my opinion and not misinformation.

You didn’t mention anything about all the batteries that are being produced, what it takes to produce them, what byproducts come from their manufacture, what happens when they wreck and spill, where they are disposed of, etc.
I can’t speak for where you or anyone else lives, but here in Texas, the grid barely gets by, as is, so you can talk numbers all day long, and hypothesis about anything you like, but if we can’t handle day to day power generation, adding those vehicles isn’t helping.
Either way, I’m not trying to spread misinformation, I’m questioning the blind push to EV, because it’s green and better, and simply asking questions regarding things nobody ever seems to talk about.
 

Whitboy82

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…as far as using cars to store power… Do you know how much it costs to hook up a bypass in a residential home?
 

ASIMO Assassin

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Not to mention, the environment isn’t much better off electric. Once you factor all the heavy metal factories pumping out toxic batteries, and all their byproducts, and let’s not forget where the power comes from, in most places, to charge up that EV.
My concerns with current battery tech is the mining operations where the materials are coming from. Heavy metal mines tend to be some of the worst environmental damage offenders because of the need for massive toxic tailings ponds.

A good example is this Mine in BC. You are talking about one of the most regulated mining operations in the world, and this kind of thing still happens from time to time.
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/brit...-emotions-accountability-unresolved-1.5236160

In countries where regulations are more lax or even non-existent (China, Brazil, Argentina, Chile.... etc), I can only imagine the long term environmental impacts this huge push for materials is going to have.

Hopefully there are some major battery breakthroughs (say with graphene or other non-toxic materials) coming that alleviates the need for this type of battery.


Then there is the whole issue of trying to safely recycle million upon million of these batteries
 

TimeRacer

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Thats a very common myth that is spread about EVs and its simply not true. The emissions are higher to produce an EV but they taper off because they do not produce emissions. It would only be a 25% increase in capacity from the power gird which can easily be increased. The grid has increased by 4% every year from 1960-2000. Also EVs can be used as energy storage for the grid.

You can be cynical and argue that EVs aren't much better for the environment, which you are not wrong technically because its impossible to completely eliminate the impact we have on the environment as humans living in a post industrial revolution world. However, it is wrong to suggest that the "environment isn't much off electric." EVs have a lower carbon footprint than gasoline cars even when accounting for coal powered plants to charge them. Its fine if you don't like EVs, but dont spread misinformation please
EV's themselves don't produce emissions in normal use but the fuel they use definitely does along with the energy storage systems they use. Don't fall prey to the same kind of myths. EV's produce over double the carbon emissions in production than a similar gas powered car at a typical factory. BMW's i3 and a few Subaru plants (probably more, I don't keep track) are located primarily around eco friendly power availability so specific cars can have lower carbon footprints than similar cars located around labor centers. Generally though around 10k-20k miles the carbon footprints of the EV and gas powered cars are similar accounting for the fuel used and battery replacement schedule. From that point on the EV will have a lower footprint even if all the power generation is done via coal firing power plants.

As for the grid, one needs to understand power demand also increases annually. Every year we demand more power per capita. Tack on the crypto mining craze and the increased usage of A/C due to weather changes 4% isn't going to be enough. Across the nation/world we're still seeing brownouts and blackouts and occasionally systematic failures (Texas among others) because peak usage is beyond our ability to reliably produce. Now with power generation being a political issue and residential and commercial power generation (rooftop solar) being actively pushed against in certain regions the power generation growth isn't certain. Much of this can be normalized once 2-way power systems become more of the norm and everyone has a big battery (your EV car) to power your house on during peak demand and charge it while you're asleep. But we're not there yet and it's still quite a ways off especially as it becomes even more political going forward.
 

Lamotrigine

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The blind rush into EVs is just crazy… Governments all over the world is pushing too hard while battery technology is not advanced enough to handle the switchover, both environmentally and technically. Soon they will face the karma 10/15 years later where the old batteries needed to be disposed of or recycled and I believe this is gonna produce more emissions. Pushing technology is fine but not blind rushing into it and phasing out gasoline cars too quickly, many parts of the world still don’t have the infrastructure to do it yet. 2035 is just silly to me.
 
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