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PRL Motorsports

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Now that our team has developed a rather extensive line of basic bolt-on parts for the 11th Gen 1.5T Civic (a High Volume Intake System is still in the primary development stages, we will be discussing at a later date), it's time to take a deeper look at other components to see where else we can unlock power. One of the first things that comes to mind is upgrading the factory turbocharger to increase airflow and efficiency. Though Honda has implemented quite a few new features to the 11th Gen's turbocharger (to be discussed) in comparison to the 10th Gen, we are confident that there is still more power potential to be unlocked.

In past years we have specialized in inclusive turbocharger kits for a variety of reasons, mainly due to the fact small-frame turbochargers limit extreme peak-power goals for the ultimate record-hungry enthusiast. However, with more manufacturers normalizing low-revving, small displacement, direct-injection engines with integrated exhaust manifolds, these once feasible goals are becoming increasingly harder to reach. Instead, we will be using all of the data and experience we've learned over the years and shifting focus towards a drop-in upgrade in an effort to develop a turbo that appeals to the masses. Yes, we will be using our experiences with the P600 and other drop-ins as a starting point. Yes, we understand longevity and reliability is critical. Yes, developing a high-power capable turbocharger is still at heart - we are a performance company after all. Our questions for the community are:

What features are important to you? What do you want to see with this turbocharger? What (reasonable) power goals do you have in mind? What purpose does your vehicle serve? Oh, and who's ready?

https://prlmotorsports.com/blogs/pr...1-5t-drop-in-turbocharger-upgrade-development

11thGenTurbo-3.jpg

11thGenTurbo-1.jpg


11thGenTurbo-2.jpg

 
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PRL Motorsports

PRL Motorsports

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One of the first steps in our product development process is determining the specifics and geometry of existing components in an effort to understand how/why things work. To do so, we disassembled the factory 11th Gen Honda Civic 1.5L Turbocharger to collect measurements and data. Fortunately for us, our team had a factory 10th Gen Civic 1.5L (Si) Turbocharger here to use for a side-by-side comparison. It is important to note that all 1.5L Turbo models for the 11th Gen Civic now use the same turbocharger part number. For those that may have missed it, checkout our Part 1 Blog Post!

Just like Honda's 10th Generation Civic Turbo platform, the 11th Generation's L15 utilizes an integrated exhaust manifold in its cylinder head. Because of this, the turbocharger bolts directly to the cylinder head. It is important to note that the 10th Gen Civic cylinder head merges all four cylinders into one exhaust outlet port. However, the 11th Gen Civic utilizes two exhaust ports, merging two cylinders in each port, much like the 10th Generation 1.5L Turbo Accord (the cylinder head castings are actually the same between these two models). This change was most likely done to increase turbocharger response and promote exhaust flow.

s-l1600.jpg

11th Gen Civic Cylinder Head

s-l1600 (1).jpg

10th Gen Civic Cylinder Head

A lot of folks have been referring to the factory turbocharger as a "twin-scroll turbocharger". However, after a quick inspection with the naked eye, we can see that this turbochargers is not a true twin-scroll turbocharger because the exhaust port divider only extends about 1" into the turbine housing inlet. This was most likely done to maintain response and exhaust flow from the dual-port cylinder head, effectively creating a "Tri-Y" system.

10thVs11th-Housing-6.jpg

11th Gen Civic Turbine Inlet

Though we did not measure the factory turbine housing at this time, the 11th Gen Civic turbocharger appears to be a bit larger in all ways. We can speculate that this turbo has a larger A/R and Volute around the turbine wheel in comparison to the previous generation - we will dive into this further down the line.

10thVs11th-Housing-12.jpg

11th Gen Honda Civic Turbine Volute

10thVs11th-Housing-10.jpg

10th Gen Honda Civic Turbine Volute

Though the compressor cover is visually different, there aren't too many notable features here, other than the bypass valve location. The 11th Gen's BPV is located on the turbocharger's compressor cover, whereas the 10th Gen's BPV is integrated into the turbocharger inlet pipe that bolts to the compressor cover. Also, the compressor outlet is rotated in a different location. Both turbochargers again feature an integrated electronic wastegate actuator - shown is the integrated 4-bolt mounting bracket.

10thVs11th-Housing-1.jpg

11th Gen Honda Civic Compressor Housing Inlet

10thVs11th-Housing-2.jpg

10th Gen Honda Civic Compressor Housing Inlet

All of Honda's factory turbochargers at this time use a journal bearing CHRA design. Comparing both generation turbochargers, we can see that though there are many similarities in functionality, each design is notably different in design from each other. This is most likely because the 10th Generation Civic turbocharger was manufactured by MHI (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries), while the 11th Generation Civic turbocharger was manufactured by IHI Corporation Turbo.

10thVs11th-Wheel-2.jpg

10thVs11th-Wheel-3.jpg


One of the first noticeable changes to the 11th Gen is its billet aluminum compressor wheel; the 10th Gen used a cast aluminum wheel. The 11th Gen's fins appear to be thinner in most areas (this is very difficult to accurately measure without scanning), and feature a smoother surface-finish, most likely to keep the weight down while increasing efficiency and response. Both generations use a 6+6 "split" 6-blade design. However, the 11th Gen uses a design referred to as "extended-tip" technology. Extended Tip wheels promote greater airflow, providing a faster boost response at lower engine speeds and increases efficiency at higher boost pressures. Basically, extended tip technology allows smaller wheels to achieve/amplify the benefits of smaller and larger wheels into one, compact design. This new turbocharger also has a different contour to the compressor wheel design, utilizing a more laid-over fin profile. Another notable change is the significant reduction in root size (about 24%), that is visually maintained throughout the entire root of the turbocharger. All of these revisions, including the increased wheel diameters, are how Honda was effectively able to increase overall efficiency of the 11th Gen Civic turbocharger.

10thVs11th-Wheel-1.jpg

10thVs11th-Wheel-6.jpg



Compressor Wheel Specs
Inducer Exd Ext TipExducerHeightRoot
10th Gen Si39.1N/A4616.311
11th Gen36.348.147.116.89.55

10thVs11th-Wheel-4.jpg


Looking at both turbine wheels, we can see that while both share a 9-blade design, there are still some very notable differences. One of the first things we can see is how much taller the 11th Gen Civic's turbine is - 20mm vs 15.5mm. We can also see that this new design features quite a bit more angle to its blades. IHI's turbine also utilizes extended tip technology, just like its compressor wheel.

10thVs11th-Wheel-5.jpg


https://prlmotorsports.com/blogs/pr...op-in-turbocharger-upgrade-development-part-2
 

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HondaFan777

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Good read. Really curious to see what the 11th gen can do.
 

Xpheos

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Do you guys have a time frame on a bigger turbo kit for the 11th gen civic?
 
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PRL Motorsports

PRL Motorsports

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Do you guys have a time frame on a bigger turbo kit for the 11th gen civic?
We are to begin testing our custom prototype turbos within the next two weeks to ensure performance is as designed. From here, we will begin testing for reliability and then look into production. Unfortunately it is still far too soon for a proper timeline.
 


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PRL Motorsports

PRL Motorsports

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PRL_10th&11thGen-Turbo-15.jpg


Here's a sneak peak at our 11th Gen Honda Civic drop-in turbocharger upgrade. More details and pictures to come in our blog post this Friday, stay tuned! :thumbsup:
 

DYI01

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Is this a hybrid turbo using a stock housing or an all new turbo manufactured by IHI?
 
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PRL Motorsports

PRL Motorsports

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A few months back we compared Honda's 10th Gen and 11th Gen Civic’s (which is also the same as the 2023+ Acura Integra) turbochargers, discussed turbocharger measurements/specifications and mentioned that we would be developing a 100% drop-in turbocharger upgrade for these platforms. Today we are here to showoff what our team has put together for thus far and what these communities can expect to see from PRL Motorsports.

Bigger is Better
  • Well, sometimes... As a company built on grassroots racing history, we have always strived to push the limits and develop products that offer the highest potential while keeping as broad of a power curve possible. Typically “bigger” turbocharger wheels and housings translate to higher power potential. However, there are times that “bigger” is not always better depending on the application.
Turbocharger Spool
  • It is important for manufacturers and customers to properly match turbocharger specifications around their desired power goals, driving style or application. Though larger turbine wheels, compressor wheels or housing sizes may result in increased power potential, it can also mean increased turbocharger lag/response. Properly spec’ing out a turbocharger can be a balancing act - trying to implement the best of all scenarios into one package. This is where compressor/turbine wheel aero design comes into play, such as blade count and profile. Modern technology and aero knowledge allow manufacturers the ability to manipulate or change potential airflow with various designs within a given footprint.
Spacing Constraints & Reliability
  • One of the biggest hurdles manufacturers must overcome, especially with drop-in, factory-location turbochargers, is tight spacing constraints. We must keep in mind existing housing sizes, connections to surrounding components such as oil/coolant lines, downpipe, charge pipe, intake, inlet pipe, etc. There also becomes a point where fitting too large of components such as turbine or compressor wheels can lead to reliability issues if the CHRA’s bearing structure isn’t intended to support that large of a rotational mass or spin that fast, or if there isn’t enough material left in the housings, which can lead to cracking. We cover many of the leading causes of turbocharger failures, issues and preventative care in a previous blog article
Our development team has kept all of these factors in mind while designing our 1.5L turbocharger upgrades. We implemented a moderately sized, high-efficiency turbine wheel to properly complement Honda’s small displacement 1.5L Turbo engines for optimal spool, while also mating it to a high-efficiency compressor wheel that utilizes the latest in aero technology. The wastegate actuator diameter has been increased to alleviate back pressure and promote turbine exhaust flow. Reduced backpressure from the larger wastegate actuator hole and reduced shaft speed (in comparison to other options) from our selected compressor wheel, will help aid in turbocharger longevity. A journal bearing CHRA will be retained to keep the price point down for the 1.5L Honda market.

This turbocharger was designed with the goal of efficiently producing around 350 horsepower, hoping to touch around the 400 horsepower mark at max effort. We plan to begin testing these turbochargers within the upcoming weeks to see what they’re capable of.


2022+ 11th Gen Civic 1.5T & 2023+ 3rd Gen Integra Turbocharger Comparison:
PRL_10th&11thGen-Turbo-15.jpg

PRL_10th&11thGen-Turbo-16.jpg

DropInTurbo_Wheel-1.jpg

DropInTurbo_Wheel-2.jpg

DropInTurbo_Wheel-3.jpg


Prototype Turbocharger Specs:
  • Journal bearing CHRA
  • High efficiency point-milled 9-blade billet 7075 aluminum 65 Trim compressor wheel (48mm inducer, 60mm exducer)
  • High efficiency Inconel 713C 9-blade 84 Trim turbine wheel (47mm inducer, 42mm exducer)
  • Larger wastegate actuator door
 

GetterDragun

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Is the 350-400 at the wheels? Is 400 assuming E-85?
 
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PRL Motorsports

PRL Motorsports

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Nick at Ososik Media and Daniel at Powermetric tuning put our L15CA drop-in turbocharger to the test with their 11th Gen Civic Si.

By simply bolting our turbocharger on, the car was able to produce 20+ horsepower and ft/lbs of torque more than the factory turbocharger without changing anything. Turbocharger spool stayed within 700 RPM of the factory turbocharger, which is impressive for a turbocharger upgrade, and carried power much further in comparison to the factory turbocharger. After tuning, the car made 325 horsepower and 338 ft/lbs of torque on a Mustang Dyno, which reads ~12% lower than a DynoJet. This is almost identical to the power our 10th Gen Civic's full Big Turbo Kit make. We are all extremely pleased with these results. Nick is now sending the turbocharger back to us for inspection so our engineers can decide if any changes need to be made. If all is well, we will begin doing further road and track testing for durability.

Stay tuned for more updates!

 

 
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