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blueroadster

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New FL5 owner here and still breaking in everything. IMHO, IAT numbers in the stock configuration are way too high over ambient. Even when cruising above 20 MPH, I am seeing IAT at the output of the filter box averaging over 45 degrees F higher. Being stopped at a traffic light for 30 seconds results in the IAT quickly spiking higher (see below example PIC) and then takes a while to settle back down once moving.

11th Gen Honda Civic Reducing Under Hood and Intake Temperatures image0 (2)


After the IAT, one then has to consider that the turbo inlet tube runs directly over the turbocharger assembly that makes intake air even hotter before ultimately being compressed to produce boost and even higher air temperatures. This situation forces the intercooler to have to work in overdrive to expel heat that then transfers to the radiator and ultimately right back into the engine bay heating everything up under the hood even more. The stock intercooler may actually function well but constantly pushing it into overdrive because intake temps are too high may not be giving it a fair shake.

With the turbo inlet tube running right above the turbocharger assembly, it effectively becomes a big metal heatsink. Right below it is also a hard pipe coolant line section that is begging for a thermal sleeve.

11th Gen Honda Civic Reducing Under Hood and Intake Temperatures image1 (2)


My first mod(s) will be done so in a manner to reduce intake and under hood temperatures by addressing heat soak and radiant heat incrementally and starting with the cheap fixes first. I intend to start by installing heat reflective tape to the outside of the stock airbox to see how much that will help reduce IATs. If they are still high, the next step would be to measure temperatures at the inlet. If those are high, then the next option to consider would be rerouting the driver's side brake duct into the bottom of the stock intake box.

From there, the next step would be to put thermal sleeves over hard pipe lines and completely replacing the heatsink that is the stock turbo inlet tube.

As for the turbocharger assembly and downpipe, I'd imagine the best overall bang for the buck would be to install blankets to keep the heat inside as much as possible.

That being said, what have you done in an attempt to lower under hood and intake temperatures on your FL5?
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blueroadster

blueroadster

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Here are a few PICs of what I did on my old FG2 (turbo assembly on the other side of the engine). That orientation needed thermal controls to help prevent radiant heat from cooking the harness assembly and brake lines. Managing heat and installing thermal controls on the FL5 should be much easier than having to pull the engine.

11th Gen Honda Civic Reducing Under Hood and Intake Temperatures IMG_0006.JPG
11th Gen Honda Civic Reducing Under Hood and Intake Temperatures IMG_0008.JPG
11th Gen Honda Civic Reducing Under Hood and Intake Temperatures IMG_0005.JPG
 

CTRifecta

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You're fine, once you start driving and open the throttle up, IAT will drop back to normal. I think the intercooler also impacts IATs, as I've noticed prolonged (>1min) wide open bursts results in IATs creeping up.
 




Higgs Boson

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Once air is moving off idle it is not affected by the temperature of the pipe. You won't notice a decrease in IAT by changing or wrapping your intake. Cooling it between the turbo and engine will be a better investment of your time.
 

CTRifecta

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Once air is moving off idle it is not affected by the temperature of the pipe. You won't notice a decrease in IAT by changing or wrapping your intake. Cooling it between the turbo and engine will be a better investment of your time.
Aka improving your intercooler
 
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blueroadster

blueroadster

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Many thanks for the responses and links. After reading a bit more, I'll make my first mod to include a TSP downpipe and PTP hybrid turbo shells for the stock turbo assembly and TSP downpipe.
 
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blueroadster

blueroadster

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Once air is moving off idle it is not affected by the temperature of the pipe. You won't notice a decrease in IAT by changing or wrapping your intake. Cooling it between the turbo and engine will be a better investment of your time.
Point taken...So it would seem that a reason to replace the stock turbo inlet would be to eliminate it as a heat sink. I presume a replacement would also provide a less strictive flow internally. That does not seem to be worth a $500 upgrade to me at this point.
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